Hi guys this is my first time post here

I will tell u abit about myself. all my life i have been a sexual being and have masturbated all my life since puberty. i have noticed than my erections are getting weaker. last night standing up i wnated to masturbae and tried to rouse it and use lube on my penis but it wouldnt perform and i had to abandon much to my disgust.
if i do it on my back in bed it is a bit better but not rock hard please email me or im me. what can i do
regards
jay

Tim, if you are doing that

you might as well restore your foreskin. I have been T-taping and using a Tug-Ahoy for the past two years. I have approximately 50% of the removed organ replaced. It has enhance my sensitivity, but not the regidity of my youth. I hope I will finish this process in another two years. There are several groups dedicated to supporting those undertaking this process.

Hi John, thanks for your reply

I’m 52. At what age did you notice you were less sensitive? How old are you now?
I started having problems with erections around six years ago after a very stressful year. Viagra is the only thing that helps also I take finasteride 5mg (generic proscar). I think a good long stress free vacation would help also.

I think I am the guy you are referring to

However, I can’t answer your question because I have not inflated it yet since I am still healing. A few of the implatees that have used it a lot should be able to answer that. My interpetation from my doctor and research is that I may lose an inch from the previous good erection. When I last measured when I was functional, it was about 6 inches. Now I should be 5 inches. 5 inches that work are much better than 6 inches that don’t.

I had pvc yesterday has anyone else had these before

Hello everyone;
Yesterday I had what felt like a fib but when I went to see the dr they told me no you are not in a-fib. My chest was like comming out of my shirt. I would here one real loud beat and 2 small beats after that. Well, I got an xray and an echo done and the dr who did the echo said you are having pvcs. It made me go crazy yesterday thinking something was really wrong. Has anyone else had this experence and did the dr do anything for you? Please write me back thank you so much..

Sincerly your friend from the heart
Lisa M. Davidson

Heart Surgery.

Hello All,
I spoken to the nurse at the hospital regarding about my new device. They told me I will be admitting and If I am doing well I will be going home the next day. I am surprised they will admit me for this kind of stuff. Will they make me get up and walk around? I like to lay in bed. I hate being on the cardiac floor. That’s where they are going to put me on the cardiac floor. intermediate care one step down for the intensive care unit. They also told me if I am not doing well then I will not go home. depends on how I am doing. Do you guys go into the cardiac floor when you have heart surgery? Write Back Soon,
Take Care,
Leah

Rehab unit concerns, and specialists in general

Hi there, not sure if I told you guys this yet, but I have gotten myself a referral to the rehab unit of the heart institution because I have gained alot of weight in the last six months of so and I feel that it is a drain on my heart not to mention I am concerned about what kind and how much exercise I can, should, might do without doing damage to myself.
Anyway, I went to see the coordinator a while back, got all the preambles done and then they set up an appt with their doctor after me doing another stress test, well apparently I didn’t do very well on the stress test again, especially for someone on beta blockers, so this doctor wants me to up my prescription dose. She apparently consulted with the electrocardigist who doesn’t even follow me anymore, but didn’t contact my cardiologist with congential I don’t think. and most importantly she didn’t consult with me, she set up for me to get this mugga scan test done again, and didn’t even tell me, they called my house and left a message and I am going WHAT THE HELL.
Anyway, I have since spoken to the nurse practiioniner related to my congential heart doctor and she seems to think that there is a concern and that I should do this test again, not to mention upping my medication, YEAH.
I hate all this poking and proding and looking into my CASE, but mostly I HATE when people treat me like even though it is my body I don’t have a say in the type of treatment I get or don’t get.
HAD TO VENT,
Sorry,
Aubyn

Cardioversion for Lone Atrial Fibrillation

Howdy: I just had a successful cardio version and am now back in sinus rhythm. But before I put on my running shoes and start training for another marathon let me tell you some of my experiences and what I have learned from countless hours of surfing for info on the net and calling cardiac centers and pestering for answers. Just like life nothing is guaranteed so best take nothing for granted. I am in my mid fifties and my best guess is that I developed atrial fibrillation when I had a nasty bout with pneumonia. It was asymptomatic and when I first noticed my heart rate monitor reading really high during heavy aerobic workouts I passed it off as a faulty receiver. After getting another monitor and having the same readings…. well it was nerve racking at first with the diagnosis, the constant poking and prodding of all the tests, (I don’t do doctors well) but by adjusting my daily routine to combat this and having access to medical information on the web, and the support of others who have had similar experiences things have gone fairly well.

I qualify that because this was my second cardio version, the first lasted only two weeks. I was baffled by the short success since I have been extremely cautious. I gave up all caffeine months ago, and have been tea totaling, vitamin popping, sleep as much as I can and try to listen to my body. My doctor changed my beta blocker from toprol to atenolol, and told be to take it in the evening since most people slip out of sinus rhythm in the early hours of the morning. I had been taking handfuls of vitamins which I asked my doctor about, and now I have stopped taking hawthorne berry, extra vitamin E and some of the more expensive ones. I am taking a multiple, magnesium and omega-3 and some b vitamins.

Now it’s another waiting game and sometimes that is the most difficult.

There is a lot of mis-information out there regarding Omega-3 Fatty Acids.

omega3I can explain all the bio-chemistry to you (if your interested) but I would never suggest to anyone that they ever consume Omega-6 fats period. When using the Omega-3 family of acids whether it be ALA, EPA or DHA its important to note that a balance needs to be created between the acids. National Institute of Health has put foreth that the balance of omega-6 to omega-3 bet 4 to 1. Presently most people consume an estimated balance of 20:1. Omega-6 are widely believed to be “bad” fats. Although they aren’t really bad – but when your consuming at the average level – it can have a detrimental effect.

I too use flax oil and buy generic azithromycin as well as the ground seed, its important to remember that flax oil has been proven in-effective as a protocol for treatment of heart conditions. Ground seed has an abundance of solid research that reports its extremely beneficial to the heart and arteries. More important that any of this stuff is that the Omega’s must be balanced before you will recieve any benefit whatsoever. This is a very complicated matter and my wife and others have been working on practical ways to help people balance the Omega’s as well as a “wellness” protocol utilizing fish oils, flax oil and flax seed. We have studied the Budwig protocol in depth and understand most of that protocol as well. If you want more information or questions answered – don’t hesitate to ask.

Have three suggestions:

1. You made a mistake when you tried to stop masturbating. It _will not_ hurt you!!! Masturbate more, and your premature ejaculation may improve.

Your own feelings (about masturbating) may be adding to your problem with premature ejaculation.

2. Any sex therapist will be able to help you with premature ejaculation. There are exercises you can do with your wife which will help delay your ejaculation. It’s a _treatable problem_ !!!

You will need to find a sex therapist, and tell him (or her) about your situation. This may be difficult for you — but it is better than the shame and anguish you are having now.

3. There is a 15-page chapter on premature ejaculation in:

“Guide to Getting It On”, by Paul Joannides.

It has some exercises which may help you. You can order it from Amazon.com, if you can’t find it at your bookstore.

ED or am fine?

To whom it may concern:
me
Dear ppl, Faisal here, I am 24, and quiet energetic,the problem i currently facing is that am passing through a phase of anxiety.

Actually I ve been masturbating for last 11-12 years, and now i feel myself as if i ve become impotent. Sir/Mam my penis wouldn’t errect any more, and mostly a sticky white fluid comes out befor and after pee.

But the thing is i used to masturbate via immagination, and now am purely unable to achieve errection, but once i attained it by watching xxx. Today I ordered some ed meds from canadian pharmacy cause a i havn’t prescription.
Kindly let me know whats the problem am sufferring from?
Whats the total masturbation life of penis?
Is ED possible in this young age?
Is ED age dependent or a young could as well suffer from it?
And is my condition curable permanantly??

Plz Sir/Mam do reply, i ve been searching for kind and trustworty urology support.

ps. my friend suggest that i go to a GP and get a blood test to see what my testosterone level is.

Thanks!!

Re: Vtach in infants and young children

Hi John,
My 8 yr. old was diagnosed after a routine check up in Sept. where they detected an arrhythmia. From there he was sent to Children’s in Boston where the cardiologists, through holter moniters and EKG’s discovered he has 50% of the time bigenimy and some longer strings of the ventricular tachycardia. He now feels the palpitations, but at the time had not complained of symptoms- I think at that age you don’t really know what isn’t normal? Never any dizziness or fainting. He started on verapamil, and subsequent moniters should no decrease, so they switched him to atenolol, which now he is having side effects- dizziness, tired, eye strain, joint pain. So we’re decreasing the dose slightly- because the VT is still there, too. In two weeks he is scheduled for a catheter ablation, of which now I learned is only 50% chance of curing it.
Part of us is frustrated by the “run around” we feel like we’re getting- what if we did nothing? He had no symptoms, and has a healthy heart. He seams worse since the meds were started, not before.
Any thoughts? I guess any irregular heart eventually can cause damage or tire of working so hard. My pediatrician says it is a gray area because it is so uncommon in kids.
The specific title I just learned they think it is right ventricular outflow tract VT, which is analogous to a child with SVT, but with lower success rates for medical therapy and catheter ablation.
M.A.

Vtach in infants and young children

Excuse me for prying, but ever since the original question was posted I was wondering how vtach was found in such a young baby? I presume just a normal postnatal checkup uncovered it, but were there any symptoms you recognized after the diagnosis? In other words, how did the baby react? I fully understand the doctor wanting to wait and see before moving on to anything more aggressive and am also wondering if any other condition was uncovered through the doctor’s examination?

Many of us in this group are older adults and we all complain about our own problems, but it comes as a shock when a 3 month old and an 8
year old wind up with what I’ve always considered a more mature condition. Please keep us all posted as to the progress of these 2 young children.

John S.

Re: Hi!

Hi Paula

And welcome to the group. Tachycardia is such a scary thing to have! What did the doctor tell you to do. I have asthma and have to avoid ventolin or it totally starts my heart racing as well as going into strange arrhythmia. What type of tachycardia did the doctor say you have Paula and did he suggest any medications or further tests? I hope you never get another bought of tachycardia again…

–Heather

Hi!

Hi there, just wanted to introduce myself. My name is Paula I’m 37 years old.and I live in Ontario Canada. I’ve had asthma since birth but I’ve just been diagnosed with Tachycardia. Long story short ventolin triggers the tachycardia. I had a really bad asthma attack last Tuesday which landed me in the E.R. Later that night I was in Intensive Care with a pulse of 175 and not having a clue what was wrong with me. It was a pretty scary time. I guess I’m just looking for a little support group and get over the scare. So if any of you kind hearted spirts are willing to lend an ear I’d sure appreciate it. Thanks in advance Paula.

Re: controling heart rate with toprol for atrial fibrillation

Andrew: Welcome to a group of many millions of us worldwide with atrial fibrillation. If you haven’t heard, this is the most common arrhythmia around. I’ve had this problem since I was a teenager but since I reached the age of sixty and beyond it has become worse and worse. My quality of life dropped drastically.

After going through several doctors, family practice, internists, cardiologists, (several of these), all of whom told me roughly, “It is not life threatening so get used to it and try *this*!” This attitude on their part only frustrated me so I began to research the problem on my own, mostly through the internet. What I’ve found out is that Afib is a major mystery to the entire medical profession. It seems everybody has there own, different ideas as to the causes, treatments and remedies for this problem. The one thing that everone agrees upon is that you want to protect yourself from having a stroke by taking blood thinners which will limit any clots from reaching your brain. A mild anticoagulant is aspirin; a stronger one is warfarin but this has to be carefully monitored by frequent blood tests.

The two major current schools of thought as to the control of Afib is heart rate vs. heart rhythm control. Rate control seems to be easier and safer to control. Rhythm control needs drugs that have serious side effects and are in some case dangerous. A more radical control of rhythm is ablation,(destruction), of the sources of the incorrect heart operation. This is not major surgery but it too has its’ limitations. I personally am waiting for more research on this procedure before I attempt it, but this does seem to be the present road to the “magic bullet” that every one is looking for.

The toprol you are taking is mostly a ‘rate’ control drug. It tends to keep your heart beat down but it probably causes you to feel tired all the time, right? It is a “beta blocker” and there are dozens of them on the market.

I would suggest that you do more searching on your own. For instance, right here in Yahoo is an Afibsupport group that probably has more back and forth dialogue than you can handle in an hour a day of reading, but give it a try. If you have Afib, the problem will only get worse as you grow older so start learning all you can now. At least you will be more active in your own medical solution for a cure to your problems. Also, the best type of doctor to consult for Afib is an electrophysiologist — EP. This would be his or her speciality if you don’t feel your present doctor is handling your problem well. Good luck.

John S.

controling heart rate with toprol for atrial fibrillation

Howdy,
I have been diagnosed with atrial fibrillation and am taking Toprol to slow my heart rate. The doctor has told me to adjust my dosage at will. I wear a heart rate monitor and have gone from a higher dose to a lower one since I was feeling lethargic, to say the least. Now when i exert myself my heart rate rockets. Does anyone have any suggestions. Hawthorne sounds like it might be an alternative or an addition to toprol..E gads what a chemistry set.

New One

hi everyone, my tachycardia was caught when i had a health check-up. Then I went to a GP to have it looked at, she noted that i had the
tachycardia and murmur. Though before i was told i had the tachycardia, i had already experience palpitations very often. i didn’t went to see a doc abt it though. I was referred to a cardiac specialist and he noted the symptoms too, so i would be going on the holter monitor,echo n blood test. anyone who had gone on the holter, can you tell me how one should use the diary to record stuffs down? I would like to be prepared and not not know what to do on that day.

Doctor Update

Hello All

Well yesterday was the big day, the “first appointment post ablation post mortuum” so to speak and I am not quite 3 months post ablation *grins*. I have only had one weird epiosode similar to two VT beats and a long pause but thats it in all the time since I had the procedure, and I realize my heart is still very irritated. Dr said that it takes quite a while for the heart to settle post ablation and said to start feeling a few differences 6 months on. The doctor said due to my then chronic condition it should have reared its ugly head again but hasnt so he is confident that they GOT my RVOT. I am just so happy and relieved but I am quietly optimistic. Dr said he didn’t want to see me again and if I needed him I could come back. I said I never wanted to see him again, in the nicest possible way of course. So thats the news I suppose. I still get PVC’s and the doctor said that I would continue to have those and quite frankly, I can live with those…

Heather from Aussie

Had the 2 day stress test done (chemical version)

How not fun was that. Everything was fine til 2 seconds after they injected the dang stuff i started to get massive chest pain. I do mean massive. I thought i had chest pain up the stairs NOTHING like this pain. It was difficult to breathe when it was feeling like ur chest was caving in . It was very unbareable. But luckily it was only 10 minutes. I couldnt have lasted longer yuck. I dont know if they saw any abnormalities or not but obviously something is there because i have to see the dr. on the 11th but they must not be overly concerned about it right now because i dont see him til then. So its done, over w/ . met some nice people also getting theirs done . When ur there for 2 days and sitting in a waiting room no bigger then a bath room u get chummy. hope everyone is well its supposed to be negative 50 degrees here in nys tonight yes i said negative 50 colder then mars during the day i’ve been informed, colder then canada colder then probably santas house:)
sarah

CIALIS (tadalafil) pills

Company announced the Food And Drug Administration has approved an improvement to the Cialis (generic name: TADALAFIL) label to contain information from the 26week study that demonstrated Cialis 5milligrams once-daily started in conjunction with finasteride significantly enhanced the signs of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) since 30 days.

ASSOCIATED: Urological Issues Resource Center

Cialis is a type 5 inhibitor (cGMP specific) indicated to treat erectile dysfunction (ED), the symptoms and signs of BPH, and both ED and the symptoms and signs of BPH. Finasteride is really a type-ii 5 alphareductase inhibitor qualified for the medical treatment of BPH in men with an enlarged prostate.

The authorized medical information is from the Phase 3b, randomized, doubleblind, placebocontrolled, 26week trial that evaluated the effectiveness and security of Cialis 5mg for oncedaily use or placebo administered with finasteride 5mg in 696 males aged >45 years.

IPSS is a survey assessing lower urinary-tract symptoms happening during the previous month.

The main endpoint of the research was the change in absolute Worldwide IPSS at 12 months. Results demonstrated that symptom development in patients starting BPH treatment with Cialis 5mg oncedaily with finpecia was more than those starting with placebo and finpecia (-5.2 versus. -3.8; P=0.001).

Vacation time for me

i everyone

Well I am outta here for a week, going to a particulary exotic island somewhere in the whitsundays in Northern Queensland Australia for a week. This is the holiday I have been wanting to take for a while. I am even going to do some snorkling and possibly diving if I am feeling confident enough. So far the old ticker has in fact been behaving itself 6 weeks post ablation so I suppose its time to have some FUN. I will take plenty of pics with the new digital camera and send a few to the list when I return!!!!

Heather from Aussie making a welcome exodus from the mundane to work on her tan .. ok I will stop and wont rub it in any longer.

Re: Off Lipitor now, and referred to heart dietician and rehab clinic

Hi Aubyn

Not good news for you re the liver function, however, it is one part of our body that can “heal” itself and re-generate, or so I am told. It is hard to loose weight especially at this time of the year, hope all goes well with the appointments and you get to see the specialist people soon. Heather is on holidays this week, lucky lady. Swimming etc. on one of our islands so the rest should do her the world of good after her ablation. Anyway, hang in there, it is hard to stay positively focused i know. All the best

Robyn

Label Change for Revatio, Cialis, Levitra

Tens of millions of guys worldwide have used the drugs.

Food And Drug Administration’s Guidance for Patients

The Food And Drug Administration advises patients to stop taking these medications and call a physician or doctor immediately if they experience unexpected or reduced vision loss in one or both eyes.
fdatabs“Further, patients taking or contemplating taking these products should advise their health professionals if they have ever had severe loss of vision, which might represent a past episode of NAION. Such individuals are at a higher risk of developing NAION again,” says the Food And Drug Administration.
“At this time, it’s not possible to ascertain whether these oral medications for erectile dysfunction were the reason for the loss of eyesight or whether the issue is connected to other variables like hypertension or diabetes, or to a mixture of these difficulties,” says the Food And Drug Administration.
The new labeling information is accessible as well as additional information for consumers and health professionals online.

Food And Drug Administration’s Statement

The Food And Drug Administration’s alarm reads:
“A small amount of guys have lost eyesight in a single eye some time after using Revatio, Cialis, or Levitra. This kind of vision loss is called nonarteritic anterior ischemic optic neuropathy (NAION). NAION causes a surprising loss of eyesight because blood circulation is obstructed to the optic nerve.”We don’t understand at this time if Sildenafil, Cialis, or Levitra causes NAION. NAION also occurs in guys who don’t take these medications.
“FDA has approved new labels for Revatio, Cialis, Viagra and Levitra” (NAION).
“Cease using Sildenafil, Cialis, or Levitra should you got a loss in your eyesight. Get medical help immediately.”

Lilly’s Answer

Cialis is advertised by Lilly ICOS. Vardenafil is co – promoted by ScheringPlough and GlaxoSmithKline.
“There were a few things which were included under the ophthalmologic occasions area, which included NAION,” Strupp proceeds.
“The Food And Drug Administration returned and for every one of the supporters there could be precautionary language around NAION,” says Strupp.

Schering-Plough’s Opinions

Julie Lux, a spokeswoman for ScheringPlough, tells WebMD:
“We support the Food And Drug Administration’s determination to embrace new prescribing information regarding PDE-5 inhibitors [Sildenafil, Cialis or Vardenafil] and NAION.
“We recently received one impulsive report of NAION occurring in a guy taking Vardenafil,” Lux continues.
“It isn’t possible to ascertain whether this event is connected to the usage of Levitra, to the  individual’s inherent risk factors for developing NAION, to a mixture of these factors, or to other factors.

Pfizer’s Previous Assertion

A Pfizer representative wasn’t available for immediate comment. On the issue nevertheless, Pfizer issued a news release in late June.

Off Lipitor now, and referred to heart dietician and rehab clinic

Hi there everyone
I went into see my GP yesterday and my liver function is not good, it is not tolerating this Lipitor very well at all, either is my pocket book, HAHA, so they have told me to stop taking it ASAP So I asked the pharmacy if there were any problems with me coming off it right away, apparently not, so I stopped taking it last night, thank goodness I hadn’t refilled my perscription, I only have four left, good timing. So I called the Congential Heart Defect Clinic Nurse practioner, I am not sure of her title, but she is my personal angel, anyway, and she is going to get the Doctor to refer me to their own nutriionist and their rehab clinic, for exercise and diet control for cholesterol maintenance and heart attack prevention. IT won’t happen before the New Year I bet, but it sounds like a good plan, The GP suggested modest weight loss, and diet control and exercise, easy for him to say. He doesn’t have my heart problems, my physical limitations or my family to worry about if something were to happen to me. I am VERY lucky to have the Heart Institute here in my city, that is for sure.
Thanks for listening.
Aubyn

Atrial Fib

I am new to this group and I need some help this morning. Atrial Fib started in early September. Had Cardioversion 3 weeks ago and after that I started taking Rythmol. Heart was beating regularly until last night. It is not irregular, but the heartbeat has increased to 90 yesterday. Woke up this AM and it was 80. Now it is back to around 60. I read that the Rythmol can cause other heartbeat irregularities. Any input from you would be very helpful. I will call my doctor this morning. But I am tempted to stop taking the rythmol. Thanks

Hello everyone I went and got my cathedre done….

Hello everyone Thank you all for your prayers and support. I really needed them right now. My next step is to go in and have my defibillator removed and have either another defibillator to replace it or the newest pacemaker that gets you out of atrial flutter and if your heart beats to slow helps that too. But, the problem is they need to take that one lead which caused the stroke to come out. That could be diffcult. “So please keep me in your prayers I will have this done after the holidays so my kids can enjoy me through the holidays. Take care all.Merry Christmas.God bless

Your friend from the heart,

Lisa M Davidson

Re: Re: New to this group

Dear Blissliam

Sorry I didnt get your name, and welcome to our little group. I have not been to attentive to the list as I am going through the post operative stuff since my 5 hour ablation.. wasnt fun.. anyways

You have certainly got your share of heart problems and from such a tender young age *hugs*

How have you found your treatment over the years and what other suggestions has the doctors made? Is it possible for you to have an operation of sorts to help your heart? What is your prognosis hon? I salute your courage, I think you are wonderful, and a mother and all the stuff that goes along with that.

Medication, especially the beta blockers can cause such extreme lethargy and depression… perhaps it would be a good idea to see if you could either change the medication or reduce the dosage with your doctors guidence. Many persons find lots of help and relief from including natural therapies in their daily regime, and have you though about that aspect. Many medications deplete the body of nutrients. If you look in the file area you will see a check list of the drugs and the corresponding nutrients that are depleted… a worthwhile exercise.

I hope you are able to live your dreams blissliam.

Thanks for writing and please keep in touch

Heather Anderson

Breast Feeding, Drugs and Dental Care – Helpful Tips for Nursing Mothers

What drugs may I take while nursing? Do dental materials or drugs appear in breast milk?

These are only a couple of the questions that new moms ask us. Being I have many patients concerned, and rightly so, concerning the chance of damaging or impacting the healthiness of the nursing baby, a dentist at Camar Smiles. So let us handle these questions right here.

Is Novocaine safe while breastfeeding? Yes and No. Firstly, we must realize there are several kinds of local anesthetics used in dentistry and a few are safe and a few aren’t. Novocaine has not actually been applied in america since the 40′s. Lidocaine is easily the most common nowadays. Articaine, Mepivacaine, Bupivacaine and Prilocaine are also utilized in dentistry. Mepivacaine, lidocaine and Prilocaine are approved for use in breastfeeding mothers while Bupivacaine must be avoided and since there isn’t enough research yet to hold it safe Articaine (which is gaining popularity) ought to be avoided.

nurse

Caution is recommended by the AAP with Oxycodone (Percocet), Codeine and Naproxen (Naprosyn, Aleve).

What Antibiotics may I take while breastfeeding? Amoxicillin is recognized as safe from the AAP. Clindamycin (Cleocin) and all Tetracyclines (Doxycycline, Minocin) must be avoided as they’ve been proven to truly have a potential for difficulties for the infant. Other antibiotics like Clarithromycin (Biaxin), Azithromycin (Zithromax) and Cephalexin (Keflex) arn’t our first option and ought to simply be prescribed carefully into a breastfeeding mom. Read more about antibiotics on this web site.

May I take Valium while I will be nursing? No. Sedatives like Valium aren’t recommended during breastfeeding.

It is usually best to take them right after a feeding, when taking drugs while nursing. Take it right following the longest sleeping interval that is preceded by the feeding, if you’re taking an once a day drug. If you’re taking a drug which you must take several times daily, take it instantly following a feeding.

Are dental materials utilized to fill teeth toxic to my nursing baby? Amalgam (Mercury) fillings are generally in the core of the question. Real science, great studies, just do not support those stories, though there are loads of stories about the risks of amalgam on the net. However, if you want to have old amalgam filling replaced while breastfeeding, in case you worry? Isolating that tooth using a rubber dam, for those who have a concern and highspeed suction might help ease your concern.

Breastfeeding could be such a fantastic experience for you personally. With a small caution, we are able to keep it just as safe for your child because it’s advantageous. Learn more on Board of Registered Nursing

Re: New to this group

Hi Carol,

Welcome to the group, i am sure you will find this is a friendly group and this site has lots of good information regarding arrythmias.

I am 60 years young also, live in Sydney, Australia, and have SVT. I was diagnosed in 1995 after the first episode landed me in the ER and i needed to be cardioverted. Since then i have only been back to the ER once in 2000. I have a few episodes per year, some short and some lasting 1 1/4hrs which i have learnt is far to long to let them go. I have noticed that they seem to come after stress. It seems like you can get through the stressful period but after that wham on they come!!!!!

I have not been taking any medication from Drs. for SVT, mainly because I did some research and found that the side effects were worse and long lasting then the episodes. I am taking Co-Enzyme CQ10, Fish Oil tablets and because I have arthritis, glucosamine. I take magnesium when i get the little palpitations and that seems to steady the ship.

I am married, and have 2 adult sons who live at home. One works overseas for 6 months of the year and the other one has a partner and they live in the granny flat at our house. In one way it is lovely to be part of their lives still but in another way, well i wish they would move on. No grandchildren as yet so you are very fortunate.

I wish you well and keep thinking positive thoughts and know that there are lots of people on this list that will listen to your worries. Trusting that you enjoy your time here.

Keep in touch

Robyn – down under

New to this group

Hi there, I am new to this group, I am not sure that I am in the right place but thought I would try it. I have had a heart problem since I was born, congential heart defect, and was “fixed” when I was 7 years old, or so I thought. That was what I was told. I had coortation of the aorta, a bicuspid value, irregular heart beat and NOW as of a year ago an enlarged heart muscle. After many tests and poking and prodding at me last year, they put me on medication, an ace inhibitor as well as metorprol, and most recently also Lipitor for high cholestral. I have had two children and am trying to go back to work fulltime as my youngest is in Grade One now, and I am wondering if I can do it or not. I am always tired, and often down in the dumps, and just not too motivated. Sorry to be such a downer, I am not sure what to do about it all and wondering if there is some reason for this and something I can do about it. I am turning 40 this year as well. Thanks, any suggestions please let me know. BTW I live in Ottawa Ontario, CANADA, and have the most amazing set of heart doctors available to me.

New here hello

I have been dx’d by my primary w/ mvp and tachycardia. They sent me to a cardiologist for a stress test which i was unable to do due to a knee surgery over the summer. In the past two months i have been having tachycardia and flutters/palpitations. I had a halter monitor on that showed my heart rate goes up to 145. So my primary decided to send me to the cardio for the stress test which obviously didnt fly. They wanted me to do a chemical test but my primary didnt. I don’t know why. He would rather i see a cardiologist and find another way to do it. It may be because of my other health problems. (graves in remission) , itp, hypoparathyroidism, fibromyalgia and anemia oh yeah and ibs my favorite one of all. I went to the er this monday because 2 times my heart rate went up to 160 and chest pain. They did nothing but an ekg. I don’t think they had time for the monitor or the room that they said they were going to do. I am still getting chest tightness/discomfort/heartburn feeling. I also get this pain in my neck near my thyroid gland that is where the carotid artery is. It started roughly when all this started that i need to get motrin to get rid of it or it gets excrusiating. I can feel when its fast don’t even really need a monitor any more. Can guess what it is. If i go up the stairs its usually 145 or 160, if i do normal chores it is 120 walking uphill/fast past 130-145. I find bending down/squatting affects it too. Feels like your hearts doing the cha cha when its like that. I am 27 years old this should not be happening. I guess w/ my health history, why not. I am glad to have found you and hope you can help. My husband is telling me its anxiety but i dont think so cause i am anxious all my life and It doesnt always do this. He is just getting back at me when his palpitations were bad and i still nagged him to not let them get the better of him.

Sarah mom to two beautiful(tempremental) kids alexis 4 and zachary 3, he also has a rare condition called glutaric aciduria type 2. Its a metabolic condition that causes protien to be toxic and he has random cynotic episodes when hes sick. Also he has low muscle tone (hypotonia) and severe speech delays but is cuter then the dickens both of them are.

Update on Me

Hi all

I hope all you beautiful people are doing wonderfully :o) A bit of an update on my condition/proceedure. I am now 10 days post ablation and I am VT free… woo hoo. I have had some terrible arrhythmia coming from other places…. mainly sinus and is probably due to the extreme irritation of my heart muscle at the burn site. Other than that I am taking it very easy, supporting the body with some natural therapies such as vitamin C, Zinc that sort of thing for healing . I have also noticed my blood pressure has dropped significantly and I am a little dizzy at times but I cannot complain as my blood pressure to date has always tended to be on the high side.

Let me know how everyone is goind
and welcome to the new persons
jump on in and say hello to us
we dont bite!!!

I need some help, also info on cyro ablation

Good morning everyone: I need help and information, I hope someone can help. I have SVT’s and PAC’s. I will give a little history, so you can understand my concern. I was on thyroid medication, 1/2 of smallest dose. I took this for about 1-2months, I ended up in the hospital with
SVT’s for 3 days. Then I was put on water pills, I took them for about 1-2 months and had heart dances for 1 and a half weeks, I should have
went to hospital, but didn’t. I take Atenonol 25mg(I can only take half dose,because my heart rate goes down too low). Anyway the atenonol is not doing the full job, so my doc has written a prescription for Diovan for my blood pressure. Because of my prior problem with medication, she has ordered me to take 1/2 (40mg) daily. I haven’t started it yet. Does anyone know if this is a drug that will cause me problems with my SVT’s and or PAC’s? Also if speedwing is reading. I don’t think my health insurance will pay for cyroablation. Since you have had it, could you share how much the procedure cost? Thanks everybody, sorry for the length of post.
God Bless, Paulette

Re: Re:New Member Intro

Dear Carol

Our little group is small and we are steadily growing and in that growth hopefully we will be more active, but this is just teething problems at the moment.

Yes I havent been around much because I had surgery. I had an ablation for Right Ventricular outflow tachycardia 4 weeks ago now and I havent had any VT back but boy oh boy the disrhythmia is a problem at times…. some Killer PVC’s and other odd beats. I know I am probably getting over it all and it has to heal etc so at the moment I am optimistic but realistic and hoping like anything that my proceedure was a sucess and I fall into that rather large 90% success rate for once in my life! The proceedure was not pleasant and at times down right painful. I dont know at this stage if I would do it again… who knows..

I digress, enough about me. Goodness you certainly have such a complex condition… heart and other places with a combination of medication. Do you find that your regime is helpful to you Carol? Are you in a lot of pain with the gallbladder and the kidney. I remember 5 years ago I had kidney stones and I tell ya I would rather give birth to 13 lb twins … most excrutiating! I had my gall bladder out some 10 years ago when I was quite young really and that wasnt as bad as the ablation for me WHOA! Having allergies is really a difficult thing and my brother in law has a sulphur allergy and its really hard to live with… I actually stop breathing when I had penacillin…. Drugs are difficult beasts at the best of times and even worse when we have these extreme reactions and interactions and sensitivities.

If you have any more questions etc just drop me a line, open all hours here Carol LOL.

Lovely to meet you

Heather Anderson from Aussie

ps, might be heading off for a couple of days holidays soon but will let all know….

Re:New Member Intro

Dear Carol

Warmest welcome to the group, hope your time with us is a positive one. I am sorry I havent written to you sooner ,I am only a couple of weeks post op, so I have been taking it easy and donot sit at the computer much.

Goodness you have quite a combination of arrhythmia Carol mainly atrial in origin. Tell me what sort of treatment is the doctor recommending for you. Is your condition easily treated? I think I read that the Mobitz is improved by exercise. Atrial disrhythmia is often treated by blood thinners also… on any of those? What medications if any are you on? Do you take alternative therapies for your condition?

Not so long ago I lived alone and had the heart conditon with it, a most frightening thing and I am so glad you got a medical alert system to help your anxiety regarding your condition. I used to be a type A personality and I have learned to be kinder on myself ! That alone was a process of intense personal evolution and was not an easy journey… I did it to save my life basically. Stress will kill you quicker than anything else I swear! I can understand how hard it would be for you caring for your son and all the credit to you. Dealing with profound illness is such a difficult path and so hard for the mother!

Keep in touch Carol

New Member Intro

Hello–I just read the first 10 messages in the group—so I do have some catching up—but I am so impressed with all the information. I am a 60 year old female that has had heart “problems” for at least 16 years now. I told my Docs several times about the terrible palpitations and the feeling of fullness in my chest which would cause me to have to lay down. I also had an episode of SVT of 180 for about two hours recently and my daughter called the Doc when she found me laying around—waiting for it to pass. The 24 hour Holter monitor never caught the rythems—but it continued to worsen over the past few years and they finally put me on a 30 day monitor. AHA—after only 5 days the Doc said I could take it off. I have Atrial fib—atrial flutter, of course APC,s , SVT- periods of Mobitz I AVB-(from my report), Atrial ventricular flutter and atrial bigeminy versus Wenkebach Phenomenon ? Not sure what this is—but I took it from the actual report? I live by myself and finally decided to get a Medical Alert system–one of the buttons you wear around your neck and the phone will get help if you are in trouble—just push the button. I’m not sure —but I would take a guess and say that my problems became worse due the extreme stress I have been under for the past 2 years. I have a 38 year old son who had a traumatic brain injury and I am his Gaurdian now. The stress is unbeleivable and I also am classified as having a type A personality. You may have written about this already—but I won’t be able to read anymore till this evening as I have to go visit my son. I just wanted to introduce myself and tell you I appreciate the great information I have found this morning. Am looking forward to learning a lot and maybe I may be able to share a few of my own experiences so folks won’t feel so alone. Thank you for starting ня Мthis group. “Carol”

Re: Re: Re: Re: Help!!

Dear Paulette

Thank you for your email hon. My recovery has been reasonably uneventful. It has now been 4 weeks post ablation and of course the heart is still reasonably irritated and I do get some pretty nasty PVC’s at times but I have noticed that the thumps and bumps are not as extreme as it originally was post op but getting calmer. I am just so thankful that I have not had any ventricular tachycardia return and I have been able to get out an enjoy myself, the first time in close to 3 years. I do get a little tired at times but that is to be expected.. I have basically lived a sedentary life recently and my system is starting to get used to extra activity so is my heart! At times the heart beats very strongly, almost pounding in my chest but I put that down to the fact that my ticker is getting used to working more efficiently and soon it will settle down and be calmer, but it is SINUS rhythm!!!.

The normal ablation is not comfortable, at times down right painful , and it took 5 hours for my proceedure on very little medication. When I see the doctor in January, I am going to ask him why they dont give VT people more drugs to knock us out whilst ablating! It appears over in the US they do sedate more..

Paulette hon, is there any way you could travel to another part of your country to get the cryo ablation done? Donot suffer longer than you have to Paulette. Having said that, the normal ablation proceedure isnt so bad either. Many EP doctors do not like cryo ablation funnily enough… I donot know their reasoning but as soon as I can pin them down for an answer I will definately let you know!! You know what I am like… I like to get to the bottom of the situation!!!!

Stick with the amount of medication you are doing hon and if at all possible try to relax a little. The doctors at the ER used to laugh a little at me… mind you I would be laughing a bit too.. as they could not believe how someone in full blown Ventricular Tachycardia could be walking into the ER.

I guess after all the years of suffering with this condition I did finally get to a state or grace or peace… believing that what was to be was to be and that someone was definately looking after me. I donot fear it any more Paulette, and I am thankful for my days of living and love. I guess that I am trying to say is be thankful for small mercies and that your condition could be so much worse. You are not alone Paulette and we just love having you here and I am so blessed to have met you!!

Keep in touch

Heather Anderson

Re: Re: Re: Help!!

Dear Carol: Thank you so very much for your support. I read the post and I cried, it made me feel so good, that someone understood, and took the time to stretch a hand out. Again thank you.
I had never thought of going to the hospital to take my first dose. That makes sense, (although I have a fear of hospitals too). lol But I would feel better.
What is Steven Johnson syndrome? I am so glad he pulled through.
I stuck with half the pill until I see my primary. That will be Tuesday. I have taken the pill for approximately 17 days, it is not supposed to kick in until 2 to 4 weeks, so I hope it shows a difference in my blood pressure Monday.
I put all my daily meds in a scheduled pill container, so I know what I have taken and what I have left. Because I have gone through panics about forgetting.
I am 57, I live with my 19 year old son. I am a smoker, wanting to desperately quit, and I am pleasingly plump, (to say the least) lol. I have gained a lot of weight in the last year and a half, after I got on all these drugs. I have absolutely no ambition to move. lol
Again thanks a million, we will make it. And may God Bless.

Re: Re: Help!!

Dear Paulette

I am so sorry you are having a terrible time at the moment. The drug that you are on called Diovan can cause your heart dances or palpitations. The beta block you are also on can cause depression and lethargy and tiredness and all that goes with it.Is there another drug you could trial because this is obviously giving you a lot of grief.

Paulette you are not alone regarding drug interactions and side effects, it is more common than the doctors or for that matter grossly sanitized information that is passed on to the patient masses. Paulette, is there any chance of getting an ablation done for your condition or going to another doctor for a second opinion? I would travel if needed to find a doctor that I was compatible with.

Thinking of you Paulette

Heather Anderson

ps, if you wanted to I could call you on the phone or you could call me

Re: Help!!

Hi everyone: I am Paulette, I have PAC’s and SVT’s. The really bad spells of SVT’s have been directly associated with medication that I was on at the time, one time I ended up in the hospital for 3 days,(thyroid meds) the next time I should have went to the hospital,(water pills) but didn’t. I am on Atenonol 25 mg daily. What an absolute drag. no energy, no ambition, depression. Atenonol controlled my high blood pressure for a long time, but now it isn’t. It has been high for about 3 months. They started me on Diovan 40 mg daily, about a week ago. (It takes up to 2 weeks for this medicine to work.)This was given me by my primary care doc. Saw my cardiologist Monday, he said to take 80 mg of Diovan daily. He ordered a breathing test and an echo. This is my conflict. I had been taking Diovan about 4 days, when I began having faint heart dances. I don’t know if it is caused by the meds, or the stress of trying a new med. I don’t want to double the dose, if it is the meds that is causing the dances. I just don’t know. I see my primary doc the 18th. I am thinking of sticking with the 40 mg until then. I can’t take a higher dose of Atenonol, it makes my heart rate go too low, I can’t take calicum channel blockers either, they seem to irritate my heart. I am scared, I am angry at myself, I am confused. Has anyone had a lot of trouble with meds and arrhytmia? Have you found a high blood pressure medicine that will not trigger dances. I know everyone is different, but any support or advise will be greatly appreciated. I am about at my wit’s end. Thanks so much, Paulette

Help!!

Hi everyone: I am Paulette, I have PAC’s and SVT’s. The really bad spells of SVT’s have been directly associated with medication that I was on at the time, one time I ended up in the hospital for 3 days,(thyroid meds) the next time I should have went to the hospital,(water pills) but didn’t. I am on Atenonol 25 mg daily. What an absolute drag. no energy, no ambition, depression. Atenonol controlled my high blood pressure for a long time, but now it isn’t. It has been high for about 3 months. They started me on Diovan 40 mg daily, about a week ago. (It takes up to 2 weeks for this medicine to work.)This was given me by my primary care doc. Saw my cardiologist Monday, he said to take 80 mg of Diovan daily. He ordered a breathing test and an echo. This is my conflict. I had been taking Diovan about 4 days, when I began having faint heart dances. I don’t know if it is caused by the meds, or the stress of trying a new med. I don’t want to double the dose, if it is the meds that is causing the dances. I just don’t know. I see my primary doc the 18th. I am thinking of sticking with the 40 mg until then. I can’t take a higher dose of Atenonol, it makes my heart rate go too low, I can’t take calicum channel blockers either, they seem to irritate my heart. I am scared, I am angry at myself, I am confused. Has anyone had a lot of trouble with meds and arrhytmia? Have you found a high blood pressure medicine that will not trigger dances. I know everyone is different, but any support or advise will be greatly appreciated. I am about at my wit’s end. Thanks so much, Paulette

Re: Re: Hello new to the group

Heather
Thanks for your letter.I still have my echo to do here and my Dr has already said she would like to send me to the EP. So I am hoping to go see the EP but he’s in Victoria and I imagine there will be a long wait.

Thanks for the natural therapy tips. I am going try the hawthorn. But I am on Nexium and was taking a Calcium and Magnesium supplement and my blood tests showed my magnesium was way up. My Dr. said to stop taking it, so I guess I’ll just go back to plain old calcium.

Thank you for your help Patti

Re: Hello new to the group

Dear Patti

Welcome to the group I hope your time with us is good. PVC’s are just so annoying but thankfully they are benign in most persons. That was not the case in me as my PVC’s triggered Ventricular Tachycardia. I would get what is affectionatly known as bigeminy and trigeminy, a pvc every second or third beat and this would go on for hours and sometimes I would end up in hospitable with non sustained ventricular tachycardia or full blown sustained ventricular tachycardia.

Beta Blockers do tend to take the edge off the pvc’s in many cases but unfortunately the side effects can be quite nasty, causing extreme lethargy and tiredness coupled with low pulse rate and low bloodpressure and sometimes it affects the breathing also bringing on asthma like symptoms.

There are other things you could do… natural therapies including magnesium, calcium, co enzyme 10, hawthorn berries, as many heart people and those who live with pvc’s will attest to the effectiveness of such a regime.

You do need to go for all the tests to establish whether or not your condition is benign or malignant and the best way is to see an EP doctor to do a study. He is the expert with the electrical of the heart and will be able to see where all of the problems are coming from. This cannot be understated Patti, I have seen this so many times before, persons suffering for years going from cardiologist to cardiologist. Find an Electro Physiologist and he/she will be able to do tests.

Hello new to the group

Hi Everyone

My name is Patti I am 43 years old, I don’t have high blood pressure or high cholseterol and I recently ended up in ICU. My thump was out of control, way out of control every second beat was PVC. I have had this “thump” a very long time forever more then likley. My Dr. gave me inhalers for my shortness of breath. Doctors GRRRR sometimes.They try .

Anyway I walked into the emercency here at our hospital (it is only open for emergency daycare ,test, ect.) told them I was having chest problems , no pain . They gave my heart a listen and sure enough.Beat, blip, beat, blip, So they hooked me up to the monitor turns out every second beat was a PVC. . So now I get a ride in the ambuIance to the fully functioning hospital thats out of town. I get there and I am the youngest person in the ICU. Got hooked up to the monitors. They had to oxygen to help my heart work…………… well of course every second beat and the PVC’s wouldn’t stop.

So now I am on medication. A very low dose, works great, very few PVC’s. Feeling really good except the medicine makes me really tired. Fall asleep in my chair tired. I’ve done my stress tests already got my echo coming up soon. Then back to the Dr. to see whats next .

A Primer on Supraventricular Dysryhthmias –Randall Carter Marsh

A Primer on Supraventricular Dysryhthmias

Randall Carter Marsh

The Reentry Tachycardias

A tachycardia is a rhythm that goes fast, usually over 100 beats each minute. Multiple forms of tachycardia exist, and in this section we will discuss a common form referred to as supraventricular tachycardia (SVT). This term means that a fast rhythm is originating above the ventricles, in this case within the atria. There are multiple varieties of SVT, but only a few common ones. We will first cover the most common form known as reentry SVT.
Natural History This dysrhythmia is initiated by a PAC (discussed above) which is then perpetuated by the presence of an electrical circuit which allows the original impulse to continue indefinitely by traveling in a circle. We call this phenomenon “reentry” as the impulse stays in the electrical system by continuing to travel around the circular path and reentering the normal electrical pathway with each pass around the circuit. Such circuits are usually located in a place called the atrioventricular (AV) node, but other circuits can also exist elsewhere in the heart. The circular movement of the original impulse continues the dysrhythmia in an incessant, rapid fashion so that the heart literally appears to takes off and race as if it was turned on by a switch. Because of how reentry SVT is initiated, it can really scare someone when it starts. You can be doing anything, that’s right…anything, and all of a sudden your heart starts racing at anywhere from 150 to 2! 30 beats per minute (bpm). If it’s going fast enough things begin to happen.

The onset of SVT is dependent on multiple factors the most important of which is age. Generally as one gets older the incidence and severity of the SVT worsen probably because the PACs (which start this in the first place) occur more frequently. Other outside factors including drugs, emotional stress, and fatigue can bring it on.

The onset of SVT is dependent on multiple factors the most important of which is age. Generally as one gets older the incidence and severity of the SVT worsen probably because the PACs (which start this in the first place) occur more frequently. Other outside factors including drugs, emotional stress, and fatigue can bring it on. In addition some forms of heart disease predispose you to getting PACs and therefore to episodes of SVT. Based on what we have discussed so far one would think that everyone is susceptible to getting this dysrhythmia, but, curiously that does not seem to be the case. My father and uncles all had SVT problems for years, but so far, I don’t seem to have it (I expect it anytime). Some hearts simply seem to be more susceptible than others for actually developing SVT whereas all hearts are theoretically able to do this. SVT can present in many ways depending on how fast the rhythm goes and whether any structural heart disease is present. Some people wa! lk into my office because of a nagging pounding heart, but otherwise they feel fine even though their heart rate can be going anywhere from 140 – 200 bpm. Other people come in through the emergency room literally in shock because their heart is going so fast (180 – 240 bpm) that there is not enough time to fill the heart between each beat. As result the heart does not have much blood to pump and the blood pressure falls. These people can have systolic pressures as low as 60 mm Hg. Obviously they are not feeling well. The same thing can happen to people who have underlying heart disease. If the heart is already compromised and then you suddenly make it go real fast (140 bpm or faster), then shock will also develop quickly. Other symptoms that can occur with SVT include shortness of breath and chest pain which can be profound and frightening, but are seldom dangerous. All of these symptoms resolve once the rhythm reverts back to normal. Some episodes last only a few seconds and ! may not be felt at all while others will go on literally ! for days . Just as the dysrhythmia begins abruptly, it will usually terminate just as quickly as though a switch is turned on and off. Anything that interrupts the circuit (that allows the impulse to continue) will stop the dysrhythmia. Other forms of SVT should be mentioned briefly. There are other kinds of circuits within the atria (other than the AV node) which can allow for circular movement of an impulse, but these are much less common. Furthermore it is possible to develop an SVT which is not based on a circuit, but rather on a single place known as a focus from which the impulse originates (and keeps firing). This is referred to as an ectopic focus. Sometimes you can have multiple foci that are capable of generating SVT dysrhythmias. As the mechanism for perpetuating an ectopic SVT is different as opposed to the circuit mechanism for reentry SVT, the treatment approach is also different. Finally an unusual SVT exists in a form known as an automatic atrial tachycardia. In this s! ituation the SVT appears to be an abnormal response of the regular electrical system to external stimuli, but no specific focus or reentry circuit exists. One important form of reentry SVT is accessory pathway reentry. An accessory pathway is literally an extra electrical pathway that exists outside of and completely separate from the normal electrical system. These extra pathways, which some people are just born with, can be built in anywhere within either atria (or even extending into the ventricles). Although these extra “wires” are present at birth, these connections may not show themselves for many years. These pathways (the most famous of which is known as the Wolff-Parkinson-White pathway otherwise referred to as the WPW syndrome) allow impulses to travel through them in a circular fashion which also utilizes the usual electrical path as part of the circle. This circuit, therefore, is very long compared to the usual circuits discussed above and allows for all kinds of r! eentry dysrhythmias. Even though the circuit is large (by ! comparis on), the accessory path can conduct the impulses much faster than the small circuits. This allows for very fast heart rates under the right conditions; as fast as 300 bpm. This kind of speed, although unusual, can be life threatening so that people who have accessory pathways must carefully managed. Finally I should mention a condition referred to as inappropriate sinus tachycardia. The sinus node is the place in the right atrium from which the normal electrical activity originates and in this condition it appears the sinus node malfunctions. In doing so the heart speeds up and stays fast as though it is a form of SVT when, in fact, it is the normal pacing mechanism of the heart simply going too fast. This can result in significant deterioration of heart function if the sinus tachycardia persists over months or years. The occasional patient who is labeled as having congestive heart failure (with a weakened heart) will recover much of the heart function if the tachycardia is re! cognized as the culprit and slowed down with beta blockers. The trick (and it is not easy) is to realize the tachycardia is the cause and not the result of the weakened heart.

The obvious goal for this disorder is to prevent the dysrhythmia from occurring in the first place. To achieve this we attempt to suppress PACs as discussed earlier, but such therapy may or may not work very effectively over time. Even if the medicine(s) work reasonably well, we are still faced with the discouraging prospect of long term drug therapy. In the old days this could mean 20-30 years of daily drug(s) therapy for a person who is otherwise perfectly healthy. Because of this reality other methods have been developed to prevent this dysrhythmia which are discussed below.

Treatment The obvious goal for this disorder is to prevent the dysrhythmia from occurring in the first place. To achieve this we attempt to suppress PACs as discussed earlier, but such therapy may or may not work very effectively over time. Even if the medicine(s) work reasonably well, we are still faced with the discouraging prospect of long term drug therapy. In the old days this could mean 20-30 years of daily drug(s) therapy for a person who is otherwise perfectly healthy. Because of this reality other methods have been developed to prevent this dysrhythmia which are discussed below. Let’s first discuss the approach to terminating the SVT once it starts. As discussed earlier some episodes occur only for a few seconds or minutes and may not be felt at all. These dysrhythmias may not require any specific therapy (especially if you don’t feel them) other than looking for and removing any exogenous cause. It is common that SVT will terminate itself without any inter! vention. Other episodes, however, are poorly tolerated even for a few minutes or may drag on for hours or even days. These obviously have to be stopped. In the discussion that follows you need to remember that the goal for treatment is to break the circuit that allows the impulse to keep going as opposed to preventing further PACs (which doesn’t help once the dysrhythmia starts).

People can commonly terminate SVT themselves with a little training. We must do something to interrupt the circular conduction of the impulse, and several techniques are possible. One of the best ways is to drench yourself with ice cold water. You can do this by jumping into a cold shower (preferably without your clothes) or submerging your face in a basin of ice water. When you perform this technique you are mimicking something called the “diver’s reflex”. When someone suddenly goes into very cold water a reflex starts in the brain which triggers both breathing and heart rate to dramatically slow. This reflex was first observed in divers hence the term. It is this reflex which can abruptly terminate SVT by suddenly slowing the electrical conduction rate so that the circuit is interrupted. Other methods can be used to initiate the same reflex including pressing and rubbing one carotid artery relatively hard for a few seconds, or tensing your abdominal mu! scles and pushing hard against them. You probably should not try this on your own as these techniques require some instruction and skill, but in selected cases these can be used very effectively to stop SVT.

People can commonly terminate SVT themselves with a little training. We must do something to interrupt the circular conduction of the impulse, and several techniques are possible. One of the best ways is to drench yourself with ice cold water. You can do this by jumping into a cold shower (preferably without your clothes) or submerging your face in a basin of ice water. When you perform this technique you are mimicking something called the “diver’s reflex”. When someone suddenly goes into very cold water a reflex starts in the brain which triggers both breathing and heart rate to dramatically slow. This reflex was first observed in divers hence the term. It is this reflex which can abruptly terminate SVT by suddenly slowing the electrical conduction rate so that the circuit is interrupted. Other methods can be used to initiate the same reflex including pressing and rubbing one carotid artery relatively hard for a few seconds, or tensing your abdominal muscles and pushing h! ard against them. You probably should not try this on your own as these techniques require some instruction and skill, but in selected cases these can be used very effectively to stop SVT.If maneuvers do not work or the dysrhythmia is poorly tolerated you have little choice but to get to your doctor or an emergency room. Several drugs can be used to terminate the SVT, but they have to be given by intravenous injection. The two most commonly used are verapamil and adenosine. Verapamil is a little more tricky to use as it lasts longer and can cause other things to happen, whereas adenosine is very short lived in the blood stream (seconds). On the other hand adenosine will sometimes convert the SVT only to have it recur 10-15 seconds later. Verapamil in this circumstance works much better because of its prolonged effect. Other drugs can be used, but seldom are because of the effectiveness of these two medicines. Unfortunately they must be given intravenously which means you have ! to get stuck.Many patients are already taking suppressive! medicin e orally when an episode of SVT will break through. We can sometimes have you take one or two extra doses of an oral drug which will eventually help stop the SVT in 1 – 3 hours without coming in for IV medicine. This approach obviously assumes you tolerate the SVT without problem and are comfortable hanging in there at home for awhile (while you are also trying some maneuvers).When one reflects on all of this trouble that we have to go through to prevent and terminate SVT, it becomes obvious that living with this problem could be a real pain over the long term. If having to take medicine forever is not enough irritation, just imagine what you could be doing when one of these things decides to come on. My personal favorites (excluding poor souls being pried away from clandestine romantic encounters by their hearts “suddenly jumping out of their chests”) include the very unhappy young lady in a prom dress whom I met in the ER. She was in the finals for prom queen when she unfort! unately had her first episode and went to her knees in front of everyone. Her initial embarrassment quickly turned to significant anger when she finally understood what had actually happened. Another one was the young man way out on the fringe who was in the middle of an attempted robbery and passed out with a very long run of SVT. This unlucky creature awoke only to see my ugly face with a vague outline of a state trooper behind me. He was likewise not a happy camper (not to mention the fact that he had to give the money back). Because of such nightmares and the unpredictability of this crazy rhythm and the fact that the dysrhythmia tends worsen as you age, a completely new idea was advanced about 10 years ago. The concept was to go for a complete cure of the problem as opposed to just trying to control it. And all the attention centered on the circuit that allowed the rhythm to perpetuate itself. If one could break the circuit, the SVT simply could not start no matter how ma! ny PACs you might have.

I am happy to report that we are now able to cure the vast majority of people who have SVT, and we can do it relatively easily and safely. The procedure (referred to as radiofrequency catheter ablation ) is performed from within the heart by using catheters that are inserted into various blood vessels. The catheter approach allows passage directly into the interior of the heart so that the procedure can be done from within the chambers of the heart. In other words, no real surgery is needed, and you are awake, but heavily sedated.

I am happy to report that we are now able to cure the vast majority of people who have SVT, and we can do it relatively easily and safely. The procedure (referred to as radiofrequency catheter ablation ) is performed from within the heart by using catheters that are inserted into various blood vessels. The catheter approach allows passage directly into the interior of the heart so that the procedure can be done from within the chambers of the heart. In other words, no real surgery is needed, and you are awake, but heavily sedated. By using the catheters from within we now have the ability to actually map the circuits and pathways so that the culprit tissue can be pinpointed with remarkable accuracy. Once the tissue is localized then a special catheter is placed up against the tissue and high frequency radio waves are emitted through the tip of the catheter into the tissue. Each time the catheter emits a burst of energy an area of tissue (about the size of an eraser ! on a pencil) is destroyed. Using this technique one or more “burns” is delivered in various places until the tissue will no longer conduct impulses and the circuit is broken. Once the circuit is “ablated” then you are cured as there is no way to propagate the SVT no matter how many PACs you have. This procedure usually takes from 2 to 3 hours, but can run much longer if the circuit is hard to map or ablate. Furthermore bypass tracts can also be found with the same technique and ablated most of the time. And occasionally we will come across more than one circuit in a patient so that multiple ablations will be needed.

The chances of long term success, depending on the location of the culprit, exceed 95% – a permanent cure with only one procedure. Occasionally SVT will recur and a second ablation will be needed.

Typically a person is in the hospital overnight to make sure that the normal electrical system is still intact, and then is discharged the next day essentially fully recovered. The chances of serious complications in experienced hands are in the range of 1-2% and include damaging the normal electrical tissue or perforating the heart itself. We can handle these complications, but they are potentially serious and must be considered. Rarely the electrical system will be damaged to the point that a permanent pacemaker will have to be implanted. Luckily these problems occur very infrequently. The chances of long term success, depending on the location of the culprit, exceed 95% – a permanent cure with only one procedure. Occasionally SVT will recur and a second ablation will be needed.

Candidates for ablation include most patients who are otherwise going to be on long term drug therapy to suppress recurrent nuisance runs of SVT. Once the decision is made that long term drug suppression is needed, the option of catheter ablation (including its risks and benefits) should also be discussed. People who only have brief episodes once or twice yearly (and are well tolerated) can usually be followed without specific therapy.

Candidates for ablation include most patients who are otherwise going to be on long term drug therapy to suppress recurrent nuisance runs of SVT. Once the decision is made that long term drug suppression is needed, the option of catheter ablation (including its risks and benefits) should also be discussed. People who only have brief episodes once or twice yearly (and are well tolerated) can usually be followed without specific therapy. It is the patient who is bothered by frequent episodes who really should be considered for ablation. Moreover if even one episode is poorly tolerated with passing out or with low blood pressure, then I would strongly consider ablation in that patient without waiting for even a second episode to occur. Patients who have accessory pathways (such as the WPW syndrome) constitute a special problem because of the potential of the accessory path to conduct very fast and precipitate life threatening dysrhythmias. Accordingly these people must be car! efully evaluated regardless of the presence or absence of symptoms. This evaluation is best done by a cardiac electrophysiologist. This is a heart specialist whose primary focus is on complex electrical problems of the heart, and who spends virtually all of his time dealing with electrical problems. It is this same specialist who will perform the ablation procedures described above. Some people who have accessory pathways can be followed without specific therapy, but if this is to be the plan, the decision should be made by the electrophysiologist. There are also multiple ways in which the accessory pathway can be tested to assess its ability to conduct impulses rapidly, and these studies are also preformed by the electrophysiologist. The treatment of ectopic atrial tachycardias is much more difficult than the reentry dysrhythmias as there is no circuit to interrupt. The origin of the dysrhythmia is a focus somewhere within either atria (usually the right side) in which tissue! becomes irritable and begins firing (just like PACs), bu! t contin ues to fire incessantly giving rise to an incessant form of SVT. This site can be mapped and ablated, but, unfortunately, another site will generally start firing soon after the first is ablated. This argues that mechanical approaches should only be tried in cases that are absolutely refractory to medical therapy. Beta blockers are generally used to treat this condition and work fairly well as this class of medicine is very effective in slowing the tachycardia significantly. Similar medical therapy is also used to treat automatic atrial tachycardias which, as discussed earlier, have no specific site or circuit that can be approached mechanically.

Re: Re: New to the group, questions about medication

Thanks, I go to a heart specialist, at the Ottawa Heart Institute one of the best heart places in Canada for sure, probably North America, and it was that doctor I spoke to about the fatigue, as for the Celebrex, they all know that I am on it for my arthritis, never hid it from them or anything so assumed that they would check out the possible side effects or complications of the two or more drugs.
I have kept them abreast of my drugs that I am on, kept up to date, or trying on the blood tests, and now both my kidney and liver function are high, slightly elevated they said, so I am going into my GP for follow-up about that one tomorrow. They didn’t mention over the phone what my cholesterol level is like, am curious about that one too.
HMMM
Aubyn

Re: New to the group, questions about medication

Dear Aubyn

Thank you for your email and welcome to the group. Sorry I have not been able to respond to your email as I have been quite busy of late and have only recently had an RF ablation for RVOT.
My heart goes out to you as you have certainly had your fair share of heart problems from a very early age to boot.
I digress…
You have quite a complex condition and quite a mixture of medication for your various conditions….

snip snip snip

I am on Lipitor for high cholesterol, Ramipril now 10 mg and metoptolol 50 mg twice a day, not to mention celebrex for my arthritis left over from the car accident

No drugs are perfect and everyone is different. I am not anti drug, but I am all about responsible prescribing by health care professionals AND honest patient information.
Did you know that celebrex aggrivates high blood pressure? It can also cause Syncope, congestive heart failure, ventricular fibrillation, pulmonary embolism, cerebrovascular accident, peripheral gangrene, thrombophlebitis
I dont know about you , but as a person who has some pretty serious heart problems I would be getting another opinion from another doctor regarding your condition AND your medication regime. That alone could be making your condition WORSE, as well as more frequent medical supervision for your condition.
Lately, I am finding that I am ALWAYS tired, even when I have had enough sleep. I mentioned it to the doctor when I was in and basically he said that it is a side effect, not much that he can do, YEAH,

I re affirm… get yourself to another doctor for another opinion and preferably a cardiac specialist…

Kindest Regards

Heather Anderson.

New to the group, questions about medication

Hi there everyone,
I have some questions about medication and such, I am not sure if I introduced myself yet to this group, I am Aubyn going to be 40 years old, have a congential heart defect, had a coortation of the aorta at age 7, never looked back quite frankly, was told that everything was fine, they followed me yearly and then less frequently and then as a young adult I didn’t bother much with it. Got pregnant for my first child at age 29. Till then no thoughts of anything really WRONG with my heart, no medication, no limitations.
At that point, I was asked to submit to some extra tests, EKG, ECG’s etc even on the baby and then at birth my heart went a bit wacky, but other than some fainting spells when pg and such, never thought much of it.
I was in a serious car accident at age 30, my son was tragically killed in the car accident, I had major fractures and many problems.
I then miscarried twice between my son and my daughter. I had my daughter at age 34, and between the car accident, the miscarriages and the heart problem I was high risk, they watched me like a hawk. I had syptoms similar to the first pg, dizzy spells, light headed etc, but nothing drastic. I was referred to a heart specialist at that time who followed me through the pg and after wards.
Everything was fine, my dtg is fine, and although I think I was supposed to go back and see them, I didn’t. Until I started having symptoms, severe shortness of breath, very tired, angina attacks, last summer and fall. I called for a check up and went in. After the barrage of tests and checkups. this is what they said.
I have arrhythmia’s, I have an enlarged heart muscle and scar tissue and a bicuspid value. I am on three different medications now, and recently on my yearly check up they upped the dose of one.
I am on Lipitor for high cholesterol, Ramipril now 10 mg and metoptolol 50 mg twice a day, not to mention celebrex for my arthritis left over from the car accident.
Lately, I am finding that I am ALWAYS tired, even when I have had enough sleep. I mentioned it to the doctor when I was in and basically he said that it is a side effect, not much that he can do, YEAH,
So the long and the short of it, is there anything I can do, any thing he can do, anything I should be asking him for.
SORRRY for the length of this post.
Thanks for getting to the end of it.
Aubyn

My blight

Hi there, everyone
OK here is the question, I have gained weight, in my extremities and in my belly, five to ten pounds, in the last few weeks, and I do believe that I am retaining water, not to mention FAT, haha, I am five foot five and not a small woman, but I am over 200 lbs right now. I am not at present on any diuretics, should my GP prescribe that, or my heart specialist and could this be what this is, or something different all together.
HELP, I am worried, don’t want more medication but thinking that it might be necessary, I feel like I am pg again, everything tight around my belly, my rings not fitting, etc etc.
Aubyn

New member-hello

Hello to you all,
My name is Kathi and we live in Surrey, England. My husband Rick had his ICD put in in Feb this year at St Georges in Tooting. Just after Xmas he had his first ever attack and a week later had 4 more cardiac arrests and wasn’t expected to make it. Next attack was beg of May. Yesterday he had 4 shocks altogether, the last while in Resus and is due to go for downloading tomorrow.The difference this time for him is that he didn’t black out and remembers everything and this if deeply affecting him emotionally. I would appreciate hearing from anybody who is supporting a partner with an ICD. We don’t know why this is happening. Although I am not medical I am fast picking up a lot of things and I am also interested in the following areas:- effect of Ajmaline test, Brugada Syndrome, Genetics testing and low magnesium levels.It is difficult for us to travel to our support group so I am pleased I have found this group.
Kathi

Re: Heather Anderson

Dear Paulette

Thank you so much for your kind words and good wishes and welcome to our group. I trust you will find good support and information here. We are growing steadily and really do have some wonderful people here.

Faith and a positive attitude cannot be underestimated, and I believe that I am exactly where I am supposed to be in this time of my life. My partner David, family and friends have been such a wonderful support in my life and it just never ceases to amaze me how the right people are put in my path! My last VT attack was a long way from home and I was one block away from a major hospital, nothing is by chance methinks :o)

I don’t fear attacks as I used to now, I know what I have to do and the doctors in my local hospital know me and treat me quickly and with minimal stress, eventhough the entire process can be rather stressful at times. I certainly will be most happy when all of this arrhythmia stuff is sorted out, and I am believing they will find that pesky little extra pathway this time and get rid of it for good!
My problem is I have a terrible intolerance to medication that renders it impossible for me to live a life other than being near bed ridden. The last medication I was on made me hypothyroid within 2 weeks of therapy and my bone marrow was becoming compromised, I wonder if anyone else has had a negative experience with amiodarone hydrochloride?. I am not on any medication at the moment but on therapeutic levels of magnesium these days. When I have attacks the most recent a couple of days ago, the doctors give me a magnesium drip and it settles the arrhythmia down nicely and the doctors don’t wish to use any drug therapy on me so that it will give me a greater chance of ablation success in November.The very first ablation attempt some 2 years ago was obviously unsuccessful and after much deliberation with the doctors that thought that the 4 day loading dosages of amiodarone could have stopped it, so I understand their reasoning.

I am very pro alternative therapies but and I am not anti-drug either as I believe all modalities have their places. I couldn’t understand why the magnesium I was taking wasn’t getting into the cells, so I talked to a couple of naturopath friends and they told me to increase the dosage and use a mixture of magnesium forms with potassium. I thought that 3,500mg was a bit of a big dosage but on reflection it really isn’t considering the magnesium wasn’t getting into the cells and the body will get rid of the magnesium it isn’t using. So what I am doing is trying to maintain the IV magnesium /serum blood levels, so that it will settle the arrhythmia. I must admit today is a better day and I had a nice restful sleep last night, and doing it this way may just keep me out of the ER one week.

Sleep is so important and good quality sleep. I find that if I don’t get good sleep that I have increased arrhythmia and I must admit long gone are the days of late nights! (maybe it is because I am getting old LOL). I have also changed my diet to basically 80% raw foods and drink huge amounts of water. Strangely enough, I do find that if I don’t drink enough I do get an increase in arrhythmia. It is a cheap and easy way of helping keep the funky beats at bay! Apparently many persons are dehydrated, I read a statistic that said 70%. I am not certain of the validity of that statistic but many people I talk to admit to me they don’t drink enough.

Anyways… enough of my incessant ramblings LOL

All the very best

—Heather Anderson.

Heather Anderson

Dear Heather: After reading the recent posts, I had to write and tell you what a courageous lady you are. One can not help to think of oneself being in your position, and the differences in reaction to the situation. You are one strong lady. My heart goes out to you during this challenging time. Nov.in a long time off, but with help from family, friends, and God I know that the outcome will be worth it.I pray for your continued strength, and faith, until you are cured.
God bless, Paulette

Thank you for allowing to join the group

Hi everyone: My name is Paulette. I deal with PAC’s, PVC’s, and SVT’s.and what else I am not sure. Sometimes it feels like there is a circus going on in there. lol I don’t know the specific type of any of these arrhythmias. Since joining this group, I now know I need to find this information out. I am on 25mg Atenonol (can’t take anything higher, because my heart rate goes too low) also Ativan 1 mg–3-4 times a day. I am on other drugs, but these 2 are for my heart dances. Ativan helps a great deal. I had my blood pressure any control for quite a while, but lately it has gone up. Didn’t know why. On this site I found that Lipitor is the culprit. I don’t know what I can do about it. My pressure runs approx. 150/90plus. A month ago the doc double my Lipitor. I am now on 20mg. I have been doing a lot of research and I am really interested in cryoablation. I know that procedure is available in the east of U.S. I live in California. Does anyone know where the procedure is available in the west. I would be willing to wait to do anything until this procedure would be available to me, of course unless things got really bad, and life threatening. I have had arrhythmia since I was in my 30′s, very seldom, no big deal. I over smoked, ate too much fudge, drank too much coffee. I have cut all these things, except smoking. Now, as I have gotten older the dances have drasticly increased and they are interfering with my life, what life. lol Sorry about my rambling. I would appreciate more info on magnesium, cryo, co10. With all my crying, I hope I can be of some help to my fellow members.
God Bless, Paulette

Re: Re: ..On ER’s and EP studies

Dear Lisa

Thank you for your kind email . These are very tough times of late and I am trying to hang in there for sure. I have thought about a lot of things of late and I guess I am a little angry if the truth be known. To this day I donot understand why the doctors did not implant a defib when I first had the v–tach attack, it would have been a lot easier on me. For starters I would not have had the horrific drug side ffects over the last 2 and a half years and now the decline in my heart function. Back in the early days I hardly had any heart flutters, in fact none and then the nose dive occured over the years with the amount of poision I put in my body. Now the slightest movement can actually cause arrhythmia that needs to be converted in the ER. The icing on the cake was the amiodarone, stirring up extra arrhythmia’s atrial in origin.

Let this be a lesson to anyone who reads this email. We must become experts in our conditions and know everything about its treatment and prognosis. This would save a lot of heart ache and suffering in doing so. I always say to get other opinions and I mean that. I wish I had, I would not be in the position I am now.

I went from amiodarone initally in hospital after the first attack, then sotolol, then a beta blocker, then a calcium channel blocker (this was in a time span of 2 months, my body was withdrawing from medication and then MORE was placed in there so I got more problems) , then a class IC antiarrhythmic, then a class III Amiodarone again.
Basically this is the last straw for me, and that is why I am hoping beyond anything that this EP study and ablation is going to be successful. The doctor did say that if they cannot stop these arrhythmia’s that I would need a heart transplant and that is one level I do not wish to travel

In Love and Light
Heather

Re: ..On ER’s and EP studies

Hang in there Heather,
I know it must be tought. You are an inspiration to me, even all the stuff you go through you share with us to help our lives out. You are such a sweet angel. I hope they are able to move u up even more. Is there anyway they can do this some where else so u can get this done now. It seems that they would be able to just fit u in there. It seems like u are just dealing with to much right now, and they got to know this isn’t good for u. I will keep u in my thought in prayers hon and if u need anything let me know I am hear for u. When I see what u are going through It just makes me want to sob. I feel like our typing fingers find the real hearts to a person. If I can make any phone calls to call around for u and see if there is any way some body can get u in sooner I will. Just let me know. I will help out as much as I can. I feel like you are like apart of my family. When I get on my computer and I get an e-mail from somone who has been going through so much and still cares about e-mailing everyone that says what a kind soul you are. You are so great. You hang in there and if there is anything I can do for u please let me know. Thank you for your e-mails. Keep me in touch please. Take care of your self and maybe with this group we can look around and try to get u in faster. We can all put our heads together. If u need me to do any research or anything let me know. Take care and god bless.

Your friend from the heart,

Lisa Davidson

Heather Anderson wr

..On ER’s and EP studies

Hi All

Was back in the ER tonight night but if one thing was allright, the actually attack wasnt as bad or prolonged. The local ER is getting to know me pretty good these days (infamous I think LOL) and I am treated rather quickly and they immediately hook me up to the IV with all the other wires and such.

It appears that my EP study has been bought forward for a couple of weeks and if there is a cancellation sooner I will get in (the date at the moment is October 31st a LOT better than Novemeber 17th). I am so happy that I am at least having sustained ventricular tachycardia but the bigeminy and other atrial flutters, fibrillation and PVC’s are quite uncomfortable. I guess that is about all I can do at the moment. I am ok tonight at least which is good.

One of the doctors tonight wondered why I didnt have a thallium stress test, and I will look into that one, seems a good option and I think it would be useful to show the EP docs how little it does take to get my heart into a spin. Has anyone else on this list had one of those and was it a good diagnostic tool?

Thank you all for your well wishes….

—Heather

“The only thing I know, is that I know nothing.”

New here hello

I have been dx’d by my primary w/ mvp and tachycardia. They sent me to a cardiologist for a stress test which i was unable to do due to a knee surgery over the summer. In the past two months i have been having tachycardia and flutters/palpitations. I had a halter monitor on that showed my heart rate goes up to 145. So my primary decided to send me to the cardio for the stress test which obviously didnt fly. They wanted me to do a chemical test but my primary didnt. I don’t know why. He would rather i see a cardiologist and find another way to do it. It may be because of my other health problems. (graves in remission) , itp, hypoparathyroidism, fibromyalgia and anemia oh yeah and ibs my favorite one of all. I went to the er this monday because 2 times my heart rate went up to 160 and chest pain. They did nothing but an ekg. I don’t think they had time for the monitor or the room that they said they were going to do. I am still getting chest tightness/discomfort/heartburn feeling. I also get this pain in my neck near my thyroid gland that is where the carotid artery is. It started roughly when all this started that i need to get motrin to get rid of it or it gets excrusiating. I can feel when its fast don’t even really need a monitor any more. Can guess what it is. If i go up the stairs its usually 145 or 160, if i do normal chores it is 120 walking uphill/fast past 130-145. I find bending down/squatting affects it too. Feels like your hearts doing the cha cha when its like that. I am 27 years old this should not be happening. I guess w/ my health history, why not. I am glad to have found you and hope you can help. My husband is telling me its anxiety but i dont think so cause i am anxious all my life and It doesnt always do this. He is just getting back at me when his palpitations were bad and i still nagged him to not let them get the better of him.

Sarah mom to two beautiful(tempremental) kids alexis 4 and zachary 3, he also has a rare condition called glutaric aciduria type 2. Its a metabolic condition that causes protien to be toxic and he has random cynotic episodes when hes sick. Also he has low muscle tone (hypotonia) and severe speech delays but is cuter then the dickens both of them are.

New here hello

I have been dx’d by my primary w/ mvp and tachycardia. They sent me to a cardiologist for a stress test which i was unable to do due to a knee surgery over the summer. In the past two months i have been having tachycardia and flutters/palpitations. I had a halter monitor on that showed my heart rate goes up to 145. So my primary decided to send me to the cardio for the stress test which obviously didnt fly. They wanted me to do a chemical test but my primary didnt. I don’t know why. He would rather i see a cardiologist and find another way to do it. It may be because of my other health problems. (graves in remission) , itp, hypoparathyroidism, fibromyalgia and anemia oh yeah and ibs my favorite one of all. I went to the er this monday because 2 times my heart rate went up to 160 and chest pain. They did nothing but an ekg. I don’t think they had time for the monitor or the room that they said they were going to do. I am still getting chest tightness/discomfort/heartburn feeling. I also get this pain in my neck near my thyroid gland that is where the carotid artery is. It started roughly when all this started that i need to get motrin to get rid of it or it gets excrusiating. I can feel when its fast don’t even really need a monitor any more. Can guess what it is. If i go up the stairs its usually 145 or 160, if i do normal chores it is 120 walking uphill/fast past 130-145. I find bending down/squatting affects it too. Feels like your hearts doing the cha cha when its like that. I am 27 years old this should not be happening. I guess w/ my health history, why not. I am glad to have found you and hope you can help. My husband is telling me its anxiety but i dont think so cause i am anxious all my life and It doesnt always do this. He is just getting back at me when his palpitations were bad and i still nagged him to not let them get the better of him.

Sarah mom to two beautiful(tempremental) kids alexis 4 and zachary 3, he also has a rare condition called glutaric aciduria type 2. Its a metabolic condition that causes protien to be toxic and he has random cynotic episodes when hes sick. Also he has low muscle tone (hypotonia) and severe speech delays but is cuter then the dickens both of them are.

Happy new years.

Apparent Ablation Success for VT

Dear Group

Just wanted to let you all know that my ablation attempt was successful and they found the ventricular tachycardia extra pathway problem pretty quickly and after 5 hours of proceedure ablated the pathway. I am pretty sore in the chest but my heart is now stable and pumping along just fine.

I am hoping and praying that the V-T will never return and as it appears even after a few days post ablation all is well. I was getting VT on a daily basis and other flutters and ending up in the ER 5/7 days a week .

Heather from Aussie.

Thank you all

Gidday Everyone!!

Thank you for being such a support to me during this most difficult time, it has been exceedingly rough but I am hoping this is the end of all of that.

Within a very short time into the procedure, the tachycardia was located in the ventricle. I found the procedure uncomfortable and verging on downright painful at times. Apparently with my type of TV you cannot have any sedation because it dampens the touchy mis – firing foci. The doctor ablated then when he re stimulated it, I was in VT again…. He re burned it and went a little deeper and got it! He tested the site with adrenaline and stimulation for over an hour and he couldn’t induce it. I was in the procedure for 5 hours and then 4 hours in post op then admitted overnight to hospital.

I can say that eventhough I am feeling pretty tired and in parts sore, my heart has settled down markedly. I am not getting VT in its many forms and also I am not having trigeminy or bigeminy only the occasional PVC. I can walk around the house, change positions from laying down to sitting and standing and my heart is not going into weird arrhythmia’s.

The ablation procedure is not a fun one… but I would recommend it to anyone. It took two times to get mine and I consider it worth it. As much as all the medications that I was on nearly killed me I was grateful, because it actually stirred my condition up sufficiently to find the VT spot.

I now live in hope that this condition is finally healed and now to living a happy and fulfilled life! David is positively delighted. As soon as I get the clearance David and I will go on vacation to our favourite part in the world Byron Bay….

once again thank you all

love

Heather from Aussie with the new and improved ticker.

“Today’s mighty oak is just yesterday’s nut that held its ground.”

Welcome to new members

Dear Group

I would like to take this opportunity to welcome our new members. Please feel free to jump right in and tell us a little about yourself.

I have not been around of late and have been experiencing lots of heart arrhythmia problems. Friday the 17th was the day I had the ablation/EP for my RVOT and it looks like the doc got it , although he did the common disclaimer of ‘These VT’s are touchy yadda yadda”.He had to ablate the area twice because for some reason it didnt work the first time and I went into spontaneous VT.He stimulated the spot with adrenaline and electric stimulation for over an hour and couldnt iduce the arrhythmia so its looking pretty hopeful. Post op I am a little sore but in good spirits and the actual heart has settled down markedly. I still feel the occaisional flutter and stuff which is normal but its nothing like before and apparently will take a few more months to settle, afterall, the doctor put my heart through quite the work out. I bent over today to pick up some books off the floor and didnt go into spontaneous VT WOOO HOOO.

I have to take it easy for a month (thats what my doc wants) then see them for a check up shortly after that. So I am embracing this new found freedom from symptons and I am hoping and praying that this will continue.

Wishing all good things

Heather Anderson

“Today’s mighty oak is just yesterday’s nut that held its ground.”

Newbie Here

Hello All,
My name is Leah I am from Connecticut and also 23 years old. I have a defibrillator ever since I was 21. However it will be 3 years since I have had my defibrillator implanted and I still get pain around the breast bone and it is still tender. I am on my first defibrillator. Do you think if the surgeon went in my pocket and moved it around. Would I come out worse or feeling better, or about the same? There something wrong because I would not have pain for this long. My leads hurt sometime as well. I will be seeing the surgeon on March 8th. Do you think I should leave the defibrillator where it is at? Or have surgery? What you all think and what would you do? Write Back Soon,
Thanks,
Leah